Friday, November 4, 2011

Mega Man Goes To Elementary School

You may not be aware of this, but by day, I am an assistant elementary school teacher. Though most of my hours are spent within the confines of the classroom, I frequent our library to stock up on books for the kiddos from time to time. There's your run-of-the-mill Dr. Seuss tale and Harry Potter lying about, but sometimes there's stuff that piques my interest... like Mega Man.

A big initiate going on in the country right now is the push to integrate comics books and graphic novels in the classroom. Studies and statistics show comics are a fantastic way to promote reading in reluctant readers as well as help teach writing, critical thinking, and creativity. And it really works. Quick to capitalize on this, my location has been ordering comics by the boatload -- and we've received plenty of Mega Man.

Megamix, Gigamix, ZX, NT Warrior AND even Archie's omnibus, my school library has a near-complete collection of the Blue Bomber's graphic novel adventures. Kids that have never even heard of the character before are now finding themselves engrossed in stories weaved by Hitoshi Ariga and Ryo Takamisaki. For this longtime fan, it's an awesome sight -- true reassurance that interest in Mega Man proceeds onward to the next generation. But this is only the beginning.

I came to discover the Mega Man IP, itself, is being highly recommended by school districts throughout the nation. Panels of teachers and administrators have spent many hours evaluating elementary school-eligible comics for library use, and Mega Man ranked high across the board. And that's not just because the comics are generally kid friendly: the books specifically promote the criteria teachers are looking for in comics: stories and text that captivate, inspire and teach. In time, there may be a Mega Man comic in every elementary school library. That's an incredible honor.

The roots of future fans may not be tied to gaming; rather, Mega Man comics. Certainly an ominous realization, but given Mega's uncertain video game future, it's a reality that isn't too far-fetched. And, hey, that's okay with me. When a new game eventually comes around, there'll be fresh young fans ready to fight for everlasting peace.

30 comments:

  1. You're lucky. My school has books for anything but Mega Man.

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  2. too bad they wont be playing games.

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  3. That's really cool, however, I can't wait for Gigamix to arrive.

    By the way, I saw a small typo there at the end of the last paragraph. I'm sure kids will fight for everlasting peace and not piece. :)

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  4. That's quite heartwarming to hear, Protodude.

    Between this and that middle school boy I met at the birthday party last week that I may have already told you about, I think the future of Mega Man is mostly safe. It's just missing one key thing: Actual new games.

    Say, which school district do you teach in, anyways? I'm not entirely sure the districts around where I live (Los Angeles) will be quick to pick this up, what with the budget problems.

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  5. *epicmealtime walks in*

    Megaman comics in schools?

    Fucking smart.

    *epicmealtime walks out*

    Ohhhhh Capcom.... I think the audience is there....

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  6. He keeps fighting for everlasting peace, but it never seems to get here or even ever have existed before.

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  7. Nice! See, comic books, manga, and graphic novels are good!

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  8. "too bad they wont be playing games."

    At first I laughed. Then I cried.

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  9. @Alilatias:

    I'm neglecting to reveal. You know, just in case.

    All I'll say is: second "largest" within St. Louis.

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  10. Well, this is why I've always dreamt of studying in the States (this is the States you're talking about, right?) as a kid (which I can't do anymore as I'm a near-late teen), libraries STACKED with books, and not just books! Oh if I had the chance it'd be heaven.

    Scratch that, Mega Man in elementary libraries? That's even better than heaven!!! :D

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  11. 10 bucks bets the EXE manga fits the criteria the most. That stuff is batshit awesome.

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  12. This is really awesome to hear about! :D

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  13. My Elementary school when I was a kid had to get rid of the library to make another classroom. I recall being sad about that fact.

    Not like they ever really took us to the library anyway. It was small and had too few books.

    but this IS nice to hear. Nice to know younger kids will still get exposed to the Blue Bomber through Comic media if not through games. Its probably better. Because this way, they get interested and then look for those games.

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  14. Wonderful, simply wonderful to hear, this has made my morning. The series will live on and grow maybe not in the way we would like but at least its growing.

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  15. I like that you can use graphic novels to get students to read. Awesome idea! =)

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  16. Schools should integrate more Nintendo Wii's complete with the classic NES titles.

    Teach kids good hand/eye responsiveness, help them distinguish good games from crap, and get them interested in a possible career in video games.

    It's a shame that a lot of the younger generation grew up on the Playstation and N64, so they don't have the frame of mind to judge what qualities make a great game.

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  17. Is this that so-called insanely awesome support for MML3 you hinted at before?

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  18. Cool! I'm sure you are doing a great job promoting this kinda stuff at elementary schools!

    FYI, in 1996 a tiny Rockman children's book was published. It's pops up on YAJ periodically. *looks* Here's one right now! http://page7.auctions.yahoo.co.jp/jp/auction/g101809918
    -ud

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  19. @ protodude

    i guess as a teacher and a mega man fan, this is great for you. also, you get free access to the comics as a perk.

    ...no wonder you love your job!

    ...you, do love your job, don't you?

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  20. he is made to be around 16 years old, elementary my ass..

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  21. ^
    Didn't read the post. Also, Mega Man is TEN YEARS OLD.

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  22. @hylianknightmare

    Love it. Incredibly rewarding.

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  23. Completely off-topic: That picture to the side is awesomely cute. Where did it come from?

    Also, it's nice to know that comics/graphic novels are starting to finally become recognized as a legitimate form of literature! Bonus that it happens to be Rockman stuff. :D

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  24. Why haven´t anyone noticed that pic is kinda wrong? roll posing like that to her own brother wtf.

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  25. Joseph:

    Came from Mega Man Tribute -- one of my personal favorite pieces!

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  26. I guess you have a dirty mind koti.

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  27. This is great news, Protodude! It's wonderful to know, and very inspiring. :)

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