Sunday, February 26, 2017

Brush Up on Your Japanese with Censored Mega Man Legends Dialog




Nineteen years after its North American release, we're still finding localization changes in Mega Man Legends.

Game Grammar - a YouTube channel that teaches you Japanese through video games - shined light on an obscure interaction between Mega Man and an NPC at the Kattelox Art Museum. The dialog tree in the scene is largely the same between the English and Japanese versions; however, one choice in particular was a little too suggestive for Capcom USA. I don't want to give it away but you might just learn something new about a certain character.

Thanks for the tip, RockinX!

17 comments:

  1. Japan always treats men being gay as some sort of juvenile joke. It's always in poor taste honestly. Seriously though, Mega Man with the Inspector? What bozo at Capcom Japan thought that was supposed to be funny?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A Japanese person from the late 90s with a sense of humor.

      People seem more sensitive and defensive these days. I wonder why.

      Delete
    2. He's not being sensitive and defense, you shameless ignoramus. He's raising a valid point.

      Delete
    3. Actually Anon 2, Anon 1 is raising a valid point.

      Delete
  2. Based on what I understood, she was implying that the Inspector is an Inspector Gay-get.. ho-ho

    ReplyDelete
  3. Japanese versions in many Times are always better

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No they aren't.

      Delete
    2. Yes they are.

      Delete
    3. Grow up, Anon 2.

      Delete
    4. Grow up, Anon 3.

      Delete
    5. Would all of you just stop?

      Delete
  4. How old is Volnutt? Isn't this crossing pedo territory?

    Either way, maybe Volnutt is a bear-hunter or the inspector is a twink hunting falcon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. He's about 12-14, and so are Roll and Tron. Originally he was intended to be 10, but I think that was an early demo.

      Delete
  5. I'd like to point out that censoring this dialogue was probably for the best. Different cultures have different senses of humor, what flies in one country will probably not fly in another.
    This is why some people prefer the term localization instead of censorship, it makes sense to remove certain aspects of the original game if they will be displeasing to a different target demography. I know some people dislike localizations, but from a company's point of view they have nothing to gain and everything to lose if they don't change what might be considered offensive.
    In short, I think changing this dialogue was the right choice to avoid problems.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. People don't seem to understand this and think that most censorship nowadays is just the localizers being evil and ruining their games. It's pretty sad.

      That or they blame "SJWs".

      Delete
    2. Censorship is always wrong. You should be ashamed of yourself Eddy.

      Delete
    3. Back to the cul-de-sac

      Delete

Keep it friendly. Disparaging, belittling and derogatory comments are not permitted.